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Why is growth in children a marker of health and mortality?


Principal Investigator: Kerstin Albertsson Wikland

Growth patterns in children mirror physical and psychological well-being and predict future health. Our hypothesis is that growth transition reflects activation of the hormonal axis that is important for the growth phase to come, affecting height, body composition, fertility, cognition and lifespan.

This clinical research program is based on 30 years of longitudinal data from generations of population studies. We will now update our gender-specific growth references that were based on a cohort born in 1974 using a cohort born in 1990. We will study generational growth patterns using our innovative mathematical growth model, QEPS. This model provides tools to identify biological variables for medical decision-making and explore their utility in clinical practice, for individual prediction, improved diagnosis and treatment.

We will use our model on data from randomized, controlled clinical trials to elucidate the hormonal mechanisms underlying normal growth and its reprogramming in children with growth failure. By using our recently developed mortality model adjusting for birth characteristics, we have already shown that these might well explain the increased mortality in GH-treated individuals.

GH treatment regimens across the world have been based on our results for 30 years now, and today with individualized GH dosing, based on prediction model-derived estimates of responsiveness, children can attain a predefined target height with normalized metabolism and cognition.
 

Current research

Kerstin Albertsson Wikland

Kerstin Albertsson Wikland

Senior Professor

kerstin.albertsson.wikland@gu.se
Phone: +46 708 82 29 90
 

Group members

Lars Gelander
PhD, MD
E-mail: lars.gelander@gu.se

Aimon Niklasson
MD, PhD, docent
E-mail: aimon.niklasson@gu.se

Anton Holmgren
Doctoral student
E-mail: anton.holmgren@gu.se
 

Page Manager: Annie Sundling|Last update: 10/24/2017
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